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    • Abrasivato

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      Smooth leather with a glossy look created by a special abrasive process.

    • Heel pitch

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      The height of a shoe’s heel.

    • ACS® (Air Cushion System)

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      A combined cushioning and ventilation system; an air cushion in the heel area provides air flow and reduces impact to the foot; a feature of the Victory Technic® sport shoe.

    • Aniline leather

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      Premium smooth leather that is dyed throughout. When it is dyed with transparent stains, the leather’s natural grain is maintained. It is generally dyed in a barrel.

    • Antique leather

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      Smooth leather dyed, printed or sprayed to create an antique patina.

    • Aquatic shoes

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      Shoes whose shape and materials make them suitable for water sport.

    • Rounded

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      Relates to a shoe’s toe cap; having a rounded shape.

    • Ballet shoes

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      Light, wide-open women’s shoes with a round toe and flat or no heels.

    • Coated leather

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      A general term for leather covered with a thin plastic film, e.g., patent leather.

    • Bare leather

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      Very thick, strong, undyed, naturally coloured cow or pig hide for rustic leather goods.

    • Balmoral

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      The opposite of Derby, an elegant upper on which the instep (the front of the shoe) is placed on top of the quarters (the side parts of the shoe).

    • Lace-up shoe

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      An elegant men’s or women’s lace-up shoe with a balmoral cut; classic examples would be the full Brogue or the Oxford.

    • Blucher

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      American term for a Derby shoe. The Blucher is the right shoe for men who want to do without decorations and flourishes. Its fine, shiny leather and sporty but elegant shape make it especially attractive. These men’s shoes are best in black, which makes them ideal for any occasion.

    • Boat shoe

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      A sporty loafer in a moccasin style, often with a half-covered leather strip pulled through the edge of the upper. They come mainly in a strong, water-repellent cowhide with slip-resistant soles.

    • Sole

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      The underpart of a shoe; includes the insole, outsole, heel, etc.

    • Tassel

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      An accessory on a loafer or slipper.

    • Ankle boots

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      Ankle-high boot in lace-up or slip-on versions with elastic insert or zipper; various styles and heel heights are possible.

    • Boxcalf

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      Fine, firm calf hide with uniform grain and a silky sheen; comparatively thin, but with a firm, pliable structure.

    • Insole

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      The base of the shoe that is used to hold all the parts of the shoe together, in most production methods; not to be confused with the outsole or inner sock.

    • Brogue

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      Generic term for a classic, elegant shoe with a hole pattern; see also full Brogue and semi-Brogue.

    • Broguing

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      Elaborate geometric hole pattern that decorates a Brogue.

    • Wingtip

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      The wingtip may be the best-known men’s shoe style. It differs from the full Brogue mainly in its Derby-style lacing, which gives it a classic, sporty look. This makes the wingtip suitable for men to wear not only with business suits, but also with jeans, corduroys and classic flannel trousers.

    • Cambrelle®

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      A wear-resistant, quick-drying lining that can absorb a lot of moisture.

    • Casual

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      Easygoing, comfortable, sporty clothing and shoes; currently very fashionable.

    • Shagreen

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      Leather that has a special grain due to pressing or embossing; common in imitation reptile leather.

    • Chamois

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      Leather from wild skins that is tanned with fish oil and is often worn with traditional costumes; chamois from sheep is often used for washing windows.

    • Chelsea boot

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      Men’s slip-on ankle boots with an elastic insert. They were originally worn with long riding trousers, so the typical colour is the black worn by competition riders.

    • Kidskin

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      Fine, supple leather with crescent-shaped pores.

    • Chevrette

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      Lambskin; softer than kidskin but with the same grain.

    • Chopine

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      Venetian pedestal or stilt shoe from the 16th century; forerunner of the platform shoe.

    • Clog

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      Originally a mule with a wooden sole; also a mule with a thick platform sole.

    • Buckle and tassel loafers

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      Elegant loafers with a buckle on the instep or with a classic leather tassel.

    • Colour finish

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      Leather dye that is applied with opaque pigment so that the natural surface of the leather is no longer recognizable.

    • Cordovan

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      Durable, brilliant horse hide.

    • Crushed leather

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      See Nappa leather.

    • Dandy

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      A classically elegant flat leather lace-up shoe in style in the 1920s and 1930s; comes in many versions.

    • Colour finish

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      Leather dye that is applied with opaque pigment so that the natural surface of the leather is no longer recognizable.

    • Inner sock

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      Stays in direct contact with the foot and should absorb foot moisture and stay colourfast. They are often printed or stamped with brand names, sizes and other indicators.

    • Derby

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      The opposite of a balmoral; sportily cut uppers in which the quarters (the sides of the shoes) are set on top of the vamp (the front portion of the shoe).

    • Dianette

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      Low- or high-heeled sandal or mule that has a toe separator (a small strap between the big and second toe).

    • D’Orsay

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      A women’s shoe similar to a pump; encloses the heel and ball, while the central foot remains free. It is available in many versions. The shoe’s 19th-century inventor and namesake was Frenchman Guillaume Gabriel D'Orsay.

    • Double face

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      Naturally grown sheep or lamb skin with the wool worn on the inside. On the outside its dressed suede surface is visible, i.e., its flesh side has been sanded.

    • Ecrasé

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      The grain is distinguished by grooves and folds (crimped scars) created during special tanning that allows the leather to shrink.

    • Elefanten DRYZ

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      The leather-covered CLIMA-DRYZ inner sole is made of a special breathable foam material that absorbs foot moisture and allows evaporation overnight. This prevents heat and wetness.

      Elefanten DRYZ technology keeps the foot cool and dry. Bacteria and unpleasant odours aren’t allowed to form.

      www.elefanten.de

    • Elefanten el chico

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      Elefanten el chico
      For little ones at the stage between crawling and walking — for their first steps — Elefanten has developed a program based on scientific studies: Elefanten el chico. Because when you’re learning to walk, you need the right shoes!

      Therefore the first three years of life are divided into three development stages. The crawling stage, the learn-to-walk stage, and walk-training stage.

      Every Elefanten el chico (crawling shoe, learning shoe and training shoe) has the right characteristics for its development stage.

      www.elefanten.de

    • Elefanten Free

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      The first children’s shoe with a patented sole that lets little feet move freely.

      The newly developed Elefanten Free shoes has started a movement in the development of little feet. Years of scientific research went into creating a patented sole that is so flexible that any tiny foot can move with complete freedom. The special shape of the sole lets the forefoot and heel move with complete independence from each other in any direction. That is the best training for development of strong, health feet for life.

      www.elefanten.de

    • Elefanten Tex

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      Cold, damp autumn and winter weather brings on colds and calls for waterproof shoes. You child needs shoes that don’t let any water in — shoes that keep the feet warm and dry.

      Elefanten shoes equipped with Elefanten Tex are watertight and breathable. The principle is simple and effective: There is a membrane between the uppers and the lining. This way, no water can come in from the outside, but water vapour on the inside escapes.

      www.elefanten.de

    • Elefanten T3

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      The T3 system — Three building blocks for an ideal children’s shoe.
      The WMS width measuring system
      The WMS width measuring system guarantees an ideal fit.

      Natural bedding
      The natural bedding follows the shape of the foot. This helps the child’s foot feel good.

      The Multi-Flex system
      Multi-Flex stands for full three-dimensional flexibility. With it, the shoe cooperates in every movement.

      www.elefanten.de

    • Elefanten WMS

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      Room to grow
      Elefanten shoes with the WMS system have room for pushing and growing. The push space makes sure that the foot can stretch. The growth space is a reserve for growing feet.

      The Elefanten width measuring system
      Children’s feet grow in length as well as in width. For children’s shoes to fit correctly, Elefanten makes shoes with the width measuring system in wide, medium and narrow.

      www.elefanten.de

    • Elefanten X-static

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      The X-STATIC lining is made of a special textile fibre coated with pure silver. The X-STATIC lining is made of a high-tech material that is heat-compensating, anti-static and anti-bacterial. The silver ions actively promote heat regulation and increase the movement of moisture through evaporation.

      Hence, the Elefanten X-STATIC keeps feet cool in summer and dry in winter. Bacteria and unpleasant odours aren’t allowed to form.

      www.elefanten.de

    • Espadrilles

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      Canvas shoes with a raffia sole.

    • EVA (ethylene-vinyl acetate)

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      Light, fine-pored sole material with good evaporation characteristics; often used in sport shoes.

    • Exotic leather

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      Precious, expensive leather from the hides of ostrich and emu, as well as from reptiles (mainly crocodiles, lizards and snakes); import is restricted because of the Washington endangered species convention (CITES).

    • Ankle pumps

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      Elegant, erotic pump variant with a strap swung around the ankle.

    • Flamenco

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      A simple, elegant, usually monochrome buckle shoe with medium-height block heels. The shape is based on a Spanish dancing shoe.

    • Fisherman’s sandal

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      A sporty men’s sandal with a closed toe and heel, and holes and slots in the side.

    • Woven leather

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      Woven from smooth leather strips.

    • Flesh side

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      The underside (interior side) of animal hide that is processed into suede.

    • Flesh split

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      The underpart of a split animal hide.

    • Fluorescent colours

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      Glowing, intensely luminous colours.

    • Laminated leather

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      Leather covered with plastic foil or film. See also patent leather.

    • Full Brogue

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      The Brogue is an absolute classic. Almost every man knows this classy gentlemen’s shoe model with its distinctive cut. The typical features of the full Brogue are its elegant hole pattern, also called a rosette, on the toe, its strong, robust soles and its welt. A man is always perfectly dressed in full Brogues, whether at the restaurant, shopping, at home or in the world’s cosmopolitan cities. It goes with everything, from jeans to a suit.

    • Footbed

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      Anatomically shaped sole for supporting the arch of the foot.

    • Lining

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      Internal treatment of the shoe; made from leather, textile, synthetic material, wool or lambskin.

    • Lining leather

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      Thin, flexible leather from sheep, calf, cow or swine.

    • Gallus Clima lining

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      The CLIMA lining consists of three layers. The lining material is made of special fibres that can absorb 40 times their weight in moisture. In this way, the patented high-tech material keeps the foot cool and dry all over. Bacteria and unpleasant odours aren’t allowed to form.

      www.gallus.com

    • Gallus Clima inner sole

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      The CLIMA inner sole is made of a special foam for excellent impact absorption and footbed resistance. It provides for optimal air circulation and disperses the foot’s moisture outside the shoe. The inner sole is 95% to 100% breathable to guarantee optimum air circulation in and around the sole. In this way, the patented high-tech material keeps the foot cool and dry. Bacteria and unpleasant odours aren’t allowed to form.

    • Gallus Clima technology

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      Air-permeable, actively breathing °CLIMA technology, along with a perforated outsole, allows air to circulate in the shoe and provides a dry, pleasant environment for the foot. °Clima technology prevents outside water from entering the shoe. The results for you: The best environment for your entire foot — always.

      www.gallus.com

    • GALLUS Tex

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      The unique Gallus Tex membrane works the way skin does: A special protective membrane between the lining and the outer leather prevents all moisture from entering the shoe. However, the membrane also absorbs body moisture and directs it to the outside in the form of water vapour. Additionally, water-resistant tanned outer leather and welded inner seams keep moisture out of the shoe. Thus, in the cold, wet seasons, Gallus Tex assures pleasantly dry feet that can nonetheless breathe.

    • Pebble leather

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      Pebbling (a special type of finishing) produces soft, supple leather with a crimped grain (recognizable by a grain with small diamond shapes).

    • Laced shoe

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      A distinction is made between the following types: Laced-vamp shoe, Derby and a Ghillie

    • Ghillie

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      Rustically decorative lacing by which the shoelace can be drawn through loops on the upper.

    • Glacé leather

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      Soft, supple goat, kid or sheep leather that is pleasant to wear; often used for gloves and outerwear.

    • Grey cracking

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      This occurs mainly in the shoe’s wrinkles and can be caused by using a colourless shoe polish on dark leather. The colourless wax film on the leather surface then cracks and leaves behind grey/white traces.

    • Harness leather

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      Cowhide, similar to bare leather, for making horse harnesses and bridles.

    • Hide

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      Animal hide is the raw material for leather production. The animals include cow, calf, sheep, goat, swine and others (wild game, ostrich, reptile, horse, etc.).

    • High front

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      A shoe that closes high on the instep.

    • Buckskin

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      Raw cow or deer leather abraded on the back of the hide; has a velvety texture.

    • Impregnated leather

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      Leather impregnated during tanning that thereby becomes dirt- and water-resistant. This type of impregnation is more effective than, for example, impregnation sprays used later in the process.

    • Jodhpur

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      Masculine, knee-high unisex ankle boot with a round strap guided around the ankle and closed at the side with a buckle. It gets its name from Indian riding trousers.

    • Russia leather

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      Very tough, hard-wearing cow or calf leather treated with birch tar oil; originally from Russia.

    • Calf suede

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      Calf leather abraded on the flesh side.

    • Box toe

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      Square shape of the shoe toe.

    • Nappa leather

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      Synonym: Crushed leather. Soft, supple leather that has a wrinkled, crumpled surface.

    • Comfort shoe

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      A pleasant shoe for sensitive feet, with features such as a footbed, padding, air cushioning, an extended heel counter, soft leather, plenty of toe room and a width system.

    • Patent leather

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      An extremely glossy leather with an enamel or film-coated surface (usually cow, calf or goat leather).

    • Strap pump

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      High-instep pumps with side slits; the instep and quarters are bound on both sides with a strap.

    • Outsole

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      Besides the heel, the sole takes the most wear and abrasion. It can be made of rubber, leather (usually cow leather) or plastic.

    • Leather

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      Animal hide that is made durable by tanning and that keeps its natural characteristics (does not rot from moisture and doesn’t break when dry).

    • Last

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      A replica of a human foot for producing shoes. It determines the shoe’s size, width, fit and heel height.

    • Loafer

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      A comfortable slip-on shoe with various heel heights; recognized by a vamp based on a moccasin shape.

    • Longwing

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      The complex, sporty design of the full Brogue is reduced in this model of men’s shoe. The well-known Derby lacing gives this shoe its casual look. Depending on the manufacturer, this model is available with a leather sole or a robust rubber one, which makes it exactly right in town, on walks after work, or on weekends.

    • Lurex®

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      A gleaming textile material.

    • Veal leather

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      Leather from veal or a young cow, more solid than boxcalf, with larger pores.

    • Membrane

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      Shoes with a (climate) membrane are air-permeable and watertight at the same time. Such membranes include Sympatex®, Deitex®, Paratex®, Goretex®.

    • Mesh

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      Air-permeable, netlike knit material.

    • Metallic leather

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      Leather that has a metalized coating made from metal foil or addition of metal powder during finishing; often used on evening shoes.

    • Military look

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      A shoe fashion based on a military style.

    • Moccasin

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      A sporty, comfortable slip-on. In the original style, the soles and uppers were made of a single piece of leather, and the bottom of the uppers serves to some degree as an insole. In the vamp area, it is closed with an insert to create the typical moccasin seam.

    • Monk

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      Flat, closed shoe with a Derby cut. This model of men’s shoe can be recognized immediately by its side buckle — often gold or sliver, but also black among younger people. Monk shoes can be found in almost every men’s shoe collection. Its design is both sporty and classic, making it ideal with corduroy or linen trousers, as well as with a solid-coloured or striped suit.

    • Napped leather

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      Napping is a way of finishing raw leathers. For suede, the flesh side is abraded, while for nubuck the grain side is abraded.

    • Grain

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      The grain surface is on the upper side, that is the fur side, of the animal hide. It displays the characteristic hair pore pattern for each animal.

    • Grained leather

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      Leather treated in such a way that the hide’s grain surface is completely preserved.

    • Grain side

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      The upper side of an animal hide, the side containing the fur on the live animal. It is processed into smooth leather, patent leather or nubuck leather.

    • Neoprene

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      A material used for aquatic shoes.

    • Norwegian-front Oxford

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      Typical for this men’s shoe model is the unmistakable bulging seam in the toe, which often makes this shoe taper to the shape of its last. Traditional Norwegian-front Oxfords are made of sporty embossed leather and are offered with robust, hard-wearing rubber outsoles. This makes them exactly the right model for any fresh-air activity, whether in the woods, on a walk with the family or strolling in town.

    • Nubuck leather

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      Very fine but solid calf or cow leather abraded on the grain side, with a peach-like surface; reminiscent of suede, but finer and not as fibrous.

    • Upper leather

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      Any type of leather used for the upper, external parts of the shoe, the uppers.

    • Uppers

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      External part of the shoe to which the outsole is joined.

    • Outdoor

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      Sporty, rustic shoe style equipped with a treaded or studded sole.

    • Oxford

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      An elegantly classic, simple Balmoral lace-up with a straight toe cap; usually made of premium smooth leather and made in various versions. As its name suggests, this gentleman’s shoe style displays typical English elegance. Its workmanship and leather — ideally made of box calf in black or polished to a high gloss — the Oxford is the most classically elegant model of men’s shoe. This makes it exactly the right shoe for the theatre, a wedding or a champagne reception.

    • Mule

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      Synonym: sabot. A backless, partially open-toed slip-on shoe in various styles and heel heights.

    • Peccary leather

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      Soft, supple glove leather from South American capybara hide.

    • Pelotte

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      A soft pad for supporting the foot’s transverse arch; soothes problems with splayed feet.

    • Penny loafer

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      Leisure is its natural habitat. Its thin sole and soft leather invite you to slip it on, making it just the right companion for leisure activities. Whether it’s jeans, corduroys, wool or linen trousers, loose shirts or polo shirts, this men’s shoe combines perfectly with all fashions.

    • Perlato

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      Smooth, shimmering leather with a mother-of-pearl sheen.

    • Fantasy leather

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      Created through imaginative working of the surface of any type of leather by embossing, staining, pressing, film coating, etc.; common in imitations of exotic leathers.

    • Pigment dying

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      Synonym: colour finish; a dying method found in all product types. It involves one or more coats of colour so that the grain is overlaid.

    • Platform shoes

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      Shoes with a high blocky sole extending from the heel to the toe; in full flower during the 1970s.

    • Press grained leather

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      See shagreen.

    • Polyurethane (PU)

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      Lightweight sole material with high wear resistance.

    • Pull up

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      Greased, oiled leather with a two-tone effect.

    • Pumps

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      A classic among women’s shoes; elegant, medium to high heel, created from one piece, mostly with a wide cutaway and no fasteners; comes in various versions.

    • Raw leather

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      Raw leather is a collective term for leather with a napped surface, such as suede and nubuck leather; see napped leather.

    • Retro

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      A collective term for outmoded styles that come back into fashion.

    • Strap sandal

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      Sandals that have straps to hold the forefoot.

    • Box cow

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      Solid, strong, hard-wearing leather from a bull or cow, with distinct pores.

    • Cow leather

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      Collective term for leather made from rawhide, mostly hard-wearing and moisture resistant.

    • Instep strap

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      Accessory at the top of the uppers.

    • Smooth leather

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      Made from the uppermost grain side of the animal hide, with the fur removed; a collective term for leather with a smooth, closed surface.

    • Sacha

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      Synonym for a front-strapped shoe. See front-strap pumps.

    • Velvet calf leather

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      Calf suede with fine, velvety fibres.

    • Velvet goat leather

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      Soft, velvety goat leather, abraded on the flesh side.

    • Sandal

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      Summer shoe for men and women on which a strap surrounds the heel; the forefoot can be more or less closed; the style has its origins in Greek antiquity.

    • High-heeled sandal

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      An elegant, feminine lighter version of a sandal, with a heel.

    • Saddle shoe

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      An elegant but now rare style on which a band is applied to the instep.

    • Upper

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      The upper part of the shoe, i.e., everything that is not part of the sole.

    • Spoiler

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      Padded edge on the uppers at the heel.

    • Shell sole

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      Outsole fastened to the side of the uppers.

    • Pigskin

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      Strong, nappa leather from domestic swine with a characteristic grain (grouped pores that extend through the hide); used for gloves and outerwear.

    • Semi-aniline leather

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      Leather covered with a 50 percent opaque pigment during finishing.

    • Semi-Brogue

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      The semi-Brogue is also a classic, and its relationship to the full Brogue can’t be missed. Compared to its cousin, the semi-Brogue has a finer design with more filigree, and has a more reserved hole pattern. This less sporty men’s shoe style may not suit every man, because its elegant looks are best for formal occasions.

    • Skiver

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      Thin split-grain leather from a sheep, lamb or goat that is mainly used for linings.

    • Sling pumps

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      A pump version in which the open heel is held only by a strap.

    • Slip-on

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      Visually, slip-ons have nothing to do with the classic men’s shoes previously mentioned, but they enjoy a large fan base. Since they are made of soft, supple leather and have thin soles, slip-ons are very light and comfortable. Slip-ons are especially popular in the summer for light, casual wear.

    • Snaffle loafer

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      A women’s loafer with a medium heel and a decorative buckle over the instep, which is characteristic of this style.

    • Sneakers

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      Originally a term for canvas sport shoes, can now designate various types of comfortable street shoes for both genders. Types include techno, retro, training and designer variants.

    • Soft leather

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      A term for soft, supple leather.

    • Sole leather

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      Strong, resistant, water-repellent leather produced for shoe soles; mainly from cowhide that has been tanned with plant preparations.

    • Split leather

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      Coarse-fibred leather from grown cows made by splitting the hides and roughening the surfaces; has two raw sides.

    • Splitting

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      An animal hide consists of a flesh side and a grain side. They are split to create a grain side and a flesh side. The grain side becomes smooth or nubuck leather, and the flesh and split sides become suede.

    • Strap shoe

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      Collective term for elegant shoes with a strap over the instep.

    • Spectator

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      A classic shoe in two contrasting colours (usually black and white); available in various styles; popular in jazz circles in the 1920s and 1930s.

    • Front-strap pumps

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      See T-strap shoe.

    • Ankle boot

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      Ankle-high boot in lace-up or slip-on versions with elastic insert or zipper; various styles and heel heights are possible.

    • Stiletto

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      Pointy, 1950s-style pumps with stiletto heels.

    • Ostrich leather

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      Soft, premium smooth leather recognized by its knobby grain.

    • Tanning

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      Processing of animal hides and pelts into leather using plant (e.g., bark, leaves), mineral (e.g., chromium, aluminium), synthetic (e.g., chemicals from crude oil) or animal (e.g., oil or blubber) tanning substances.

    • Trotteur

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      A sporty or elegant women’s shoe with high uppers, i.e., a tall vamp, and a medium-height heel.

    • T-strap shoe

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      Collective term for shoes with a T-shaped strap over the instep.

    • Drawstring

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      A fashionable accessory; often a stretch band pulled through the edge of the uppers.

    • Velcro fastener

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      Hook-and-loop fastener.

    • Velours

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      Wool fabric with a short, erect nap, usually with a grain. If the nap is higher, the material is called fleece.

    • Velvet

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      Mainly a term for faux velvet in which the pile is formed by the transversely set material. However, it is also used as a term for real velvet, in which the pile is formed by the chain.

    • Vintage look

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      Newly made apparel with a torn, washed out or frayed look that is currently fashionable mainly with denim wear. Vintage look also refers to authentic retro styles.

    • Fleece

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      Coat of a shorn sheep, or in outdoor fashion the warm insert between the outer layer and the lining.

    • Orthopaedic leather

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      Cow leather similar to bare leather that is used mainly in orthopaedics.

    • Waterproof

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      Watertight; very thick, strong, unctuous water-resistant cow leather that becomes almost watertight through additional impregnation at the tannery.

    • Comfort

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      A collective term for shoes with good walking comfort.

    • Wild leather

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      A popular synonym for raw leather (suede and nubuck leather); strictly speaking a term for leather from wild game (e.g., deer, elk, etc.); it is velvety and cuddly, and is distinguished by a pronounced grain.

    • WMS last

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      Width measuring system for children’s shoes (wide, medium, narrow).
      For more information see: www.elefanten.de

    • Cigarette pants

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      Narrow, straight-legged trousers. Often with a crease.

    • Zipper

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      A sliding fastener with a rider and two rows of teeth.

    • Cord lock

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      A fastener for tightening drawstrings without using knots.

    • Dressing

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      Also called finishing; processing of leather after tanning by draining, bleaching, oiling, waterproofing and dying, among other things.

    Caring for shoes

    • Care from the beginning

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      Whether it’s loafers, lace-ups or buckle shoes, use a shoehorn. Squashed shoe spines are ugly and irreparably destroy the fit.

      Before pulling the shoe off, loosen all shoelaces, so that the foot can slide out easily. It doesn’t really take any longer, and it protects your feet and shoes better.

      Shoetrees keep your shoes in good form, smooth out the walking creases and take the stress off the sole structure. But please use them only in the right size, because otherwise they will distort the shoe.

      A shoetree is especially practical when shoes have been soaked by rain or snow. If you don’t have a shoetree, you can stuff the shoes with newspaper. Do not dry your shoes too close to a heater, and absolutely never on a heater. This will make the leather fragile, hard and brittle. No leather care product can repair this kind of heat damage. Shoes with leather soles should be laid on their sides for drying.

      Clean your shoes regularly. It is best to wipe or brush them after every time you wear them, so that they won’t lose their sheen or velvety surface.

      Take your shoes to the cobbler at the right time to have worn heels replaced, etc. This prevents greater damage and saves money over the long run.

      And give your shoes a rest — at least as long as you wore them. Even better, let the shoes rest for 24 hours, so that they can dry out.

    • The art of polishing shoes

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      The main thing is: First clean them, then protect them. Only clean leather can be treated with appropriate care products. You don’t use skin cream before you wash, do you?

      Dust and dirt are best removed with a cloth and/or lukewarm water, and on robust leather, feel free to use a brush. Clean rough leather with a rubber brush or an emery brush.

      It is best to treat new shoes with a care product before wearing them for the first time. Choose the product based on the type of leather. The wrong care product can do damage to leather, and not just sensitive types of leather.

      To refresh the colour, it is best to use a shoe care product that is a shade darker than the colour of the shoe.

      Apply the care product thinly and uniformly in circular movements; otherwise the leather gets smeared and doesn’t shine correctly. Also avoid strong rubbing during application, because that can damage the upper leather.

      Let the product work its way in for about 15 minutes, and then polish the shoe with a soft cloth or a soft polishing brush (a horsehair brush is the best).

      A SECRET FROM THE PROS
      An old toothbrush is best for cleaning and polishing the shoe’s welt.

    • Which care product for which leather?

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      Patent leather
      Clean patent leather by wiping it with a damp cloth. Ordinary shoe polish should not be used, because this will leave streaks on the leather. Always treat patent leather with a polish specially made for it. Do not use any kind of impregnation on patent leather shoes, because the leather surface is already sealed with a layer of film.

      Smooth leather
      Is recommended that the leather be impregnated with a spray for smooth leather (not in an enclosed space, if possible) before the first time the shoes are worn. Depending on the leather’s characteristics, you can use a cream in a tube (for premium smooth leather), a lotion (for soft and sensitive leather, such as on purses) or a wax paste (for coarse and grease-tanned leather).

      Raw leather
      Raw leather is a collective term for suede and nubuck leather and is more sensitive than smooth leather. Waxy products can make the fine hairs on the surface stick together. For care and cleaning, we therefore recommend special nubuck and suede sprays. The colour can be refreshed with a special colour fluid. Spots can be removed with a rubber brush or a special sponge.

      Cloth shoes
      Cloth shoes get dirty quickly and look unkempt after several wears. It is best to treat these shoes with a special textile protection spray. If they are dirty, you can clean the shoes with clear or slightly soapy water.

    • A secret from the pros

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      Grease spots
      Common household cleaning spirits.

      Chewing gum or glue
      Place briefly in the freezer and then remove it or rub it off.

      Sugary spots
      Wash out with cold water and soap.

      Ballpoint ink on raw leather
      Put sticky tape over the spot and rub strongly through the band using your fingernail or a hard object. Then remove the sticky tape with a sudden jerk.

      Snow streaks
      Wash them off with flowing lukewarm water before they dry. Later remove them with kerosene.

    • Tips for any weather

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      Weatherproof

      1. First, choose the right shoe care product

      No article of clothing requires more protection than shoes. You can make your smooth leather shoes weatherproof with ordinary shoe polish, from Deichmann, for example. How often should you polish them? It’s simple: If you wear them often, you should polish them often. If you’re out and about in wet weather, besides shoe polish, you should also use an impregnating spray like those available from Deichmann.
      Carefully spray your shoes with it before the first time you wear them. And it’s the same here: The more, the better. Repeat this process later, so that the spray can work itself deep into the leather. There is a special impregnating product for leather soles. Suede and rough leather shoes should only be treated with a shoe brush and impregnating spray.
      And you shouldn’t skimp on them here either. For one pair, you need about 100 millilitres of spray. Antique leather is best treated with leather oil. This maintains the leather’s spotted look. In especially tough cases, impregnation spray also helps.

      2. Dealing with white streaks
      If your shoes get very wet, the moisture, tanning salts and minerals flow out of the leather. This causes the famous white streaks on the shoes.
      To remove the white streaks, wash them off with a soft cloth and lukewarm water. Then let the shoes dry for a long time. After they’re dry, intensive care with shoe polish is called for, such as those available from Deichmann.

      3. Shoe care and correct drying
      Drying is best done after the shoes have been stuffed carefully with crumpled newspaper. After you have stuffed them, it is best to set the shoes down on a slant, so that the soles can thoroughly dry. But be careful: Wet shoes should never be placed on heaters, because this will make the fine pores of the leather swell, distorting their structure.

      4. Comeback care for shoes
      How to care for shoes correctly after they get wet and have dried depends on the leather. Coarse smooth leather is best lubricated with tinned shoe polish, like those available from Deichmann. For sensitive leathers you should use polish from a tube. For suede and wild leather, it is better to remove dirt with a brush, and on raw leather a rubber eraser helps with more stubborn dirt on the uppers. After that, treat the shoes with an impregnating spray. Antique leather should receive extra treatment with leather oil.

      5. Warm feet in rubber boots
      Yes, it’s really possible. You’re best here using function socks. These socks are made of a wool-synthetic blend whose interior core (a polyester) transfers collecting moisture away from the skin.

      You can also support the socks with thermal inserts in the boots. Note: After long periods of wear, your feet may get wet despite the inserts, because the sweat cannot evaporate.

    Shoe care products

    • Weather protection cream and patent leather cream

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      Deichmann weather protection cream and patent leather cream are ideal for sensitive surfaces and patent leather shoes. Their cleaning strength provides gloss and suppleness. You can find out how to use these products and about everything you need for shoe care at your local Deichmann shop.

    • Sprays for care and protection

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      Deichmann protection and care sprays and lotions can be used for any material. These care products are suitable not only for leather and textiles, but also for thermal membranes. And their price is right at Deichmann.

    • Brushes

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      Your shoes appear in a new light. Whether it’s suede, smooth or nubuck leather,  every shoe needs the right care. In our local shops, for every type of upper you can get the right brush — synthetic,  with plastic knobs or with natural bristles. Our friendly staff are ready to help you.

    • Boot shaft shapers

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      Deichmann offers the right boot shaft shaper for every need — both for high and low boots. Their robust shell design makes Deichmann boot shapers right for any size. Boot shaft shapers keep your boots in good form and do the most to smooth out the walking creases.

    • Insole

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      Deichmann also offers the right insole or a comfortable footbed for any shoe. Save your feet and joints and keep your feet at the right temperature with premium insoles from Deichmann.

    • Foam shoetree

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      Deichmann offers the right shoetree, made especially for women’s shoes. The foam shoetree with handle is made for slender, pointed women’s styles and can keep women’s shoes in their original shape. It removes moisture from the leather and provides  good air circulation. The foam shoetree does the most to smooth out walking creases.

    • Weather protection cream or wax spray

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      Brilliance in a flash: The Deichmann shoe care line provides all-around weather protection for shoes on the go. At your local Deichmann shop, we will gladly help you pick the right weather protection cream or wax spray.

    • Nanotechnology

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      Here, nature is the example: As on a lotus plant, water beads up on impregnated leather or textiles and takes the dust with it. Although previous impregnating products often needed repeating in as little as a week, with ordinary use, nanotechnology protection lasts for months.

    • Soft gel soles

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      Developed according to orthopaedic requirements, a gel sole’s construction and the integrated cushioned 3D gel zones in the forefoot and heel area compensate for any pressure actively and comfortably.

    • Shoetree

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      Deichmann offers the right shoetree for any shoe and any leather. The wooden shoetree lets shoes relax into their original shape. It removes moisture from the leather and provides good air circulation. A wooden shoetree does the most to smooth out walking creases.

    • Nano Vario care foam

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      Nano Vario spray from Deichmann is an impregnating foam for all types of modern synthetic materials and leathers. It provides long-lasting protection from moisture, oil and dirt.

    Footcare

    • Groomed to the tip of your toes

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      Summer, sun, light fashions — and a natural part of this is open shoes that you’re proud to show your feet in. Even more important is a well-kept appearance. Here we show the five steps to good-looking feet.

    • The foot bath

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      Foot baths relax and promote blood circulation to perk up tired feet. Ten minutes are enough, so as not to stress the skin. You can mix a wide array of additives to the water. Particularly soothing and effective are essential oils: Besides their treatment properties, orange, lavender and lemon balm give off a pleasantly soothing aroma.

      Once the bath is over and the skin is soft, you can do a foot peel and remove calluses. Don’t forget to dry your feet thoroughly. Moisturizing creams and mousses complete the care.

    • Massage

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      Foot massage brings perfect relaxation and gives new energy to the whole body. Reflex zone massages have proven especially effective. There are experienced therapists for this, but anyone can try a simple variant: Massage in circles around the ankle. With a closed fist, move along the length of the sole. Massage with sufficient pressure between the toes. An especially important point lies between the two balls at the front of the foot. With thumb bent, press the soft area in small circles.

    • Nail care

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      Once the feet are fit, the skin is soft and supple, all that’s left are the nails. Filing is much better than cutting, to prevent sharp edges and hangnails at the edges. If complete nail filing takes too long, use nail clippers for the centre and only use the file on the edges. If the cuticle interferes, be very careful: Germs can enter if it is completely removed. Therefore you should soften it and push it back very carefully.

    • Exercise

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      The foot bath and massage have made the muscles soft and supple — the best prerequisite for a couple of exercises. Grip your toes individually, press them and turn them. Then stretch the toes out and move them apart and together. Do it as if you were using them to type. Finally, you can try to grip objects with your toes or to crumple and tear a piece of paper with your toes.

    Men

    • Men

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      They don’t say, “Clothes make the man,” for nothing. We often see people in the right clothes, but their shoes are often an afterthought. But finding the right outfit and shoes for a specific occasion can involve a tough decision.

      That’s why we’re giving you a few tips to make it work.

    • Leisure

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      Freedom in your free time

      • A sporty monk or Norwegian loafer can be worn with a suit during the day, but it’s not just business or evening wear.
      • Casual longwings for jeans or sportswear or rustic wingtips for the country wardrobe — perfect for cords, loden or tweed.
      • A fancy leisure shoe that’s especially for summer is the extravagant Spectator, which goes with white linen, for example.

    • Classics

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      Classics with class.

      • Always wear socks whose colours go with the shoe and suit. Avoid contrasts that are too strong. White tennis socks are completely taboo with a business suit. It is always nicer for men to wear socks that are long enough to cover their hairy legs when sitting. Knee socks are a good solution here.
      • Make sure that the trousers don’t completely cover the shoe.

      The right shoe for business apparel:

      • The Oxford is a classic, rather conservative style for gentlemen.
      • The Blucher also works well due to its simplicity.
      • An elegant Balmoral semi-Brogue is also possible. However, the more distinctive the hole pattern, the sportier the brogue is and the less it works with an elegant suit.
      • Overall, the rule of thumb is, “No brown after six,” since brown shoes are modern and sporty
        and should be worn only until sunset.
      • As for women, athletic shoes are good for a casual business look for men.
      • A new trend for courageous men: Sandals, once confined to the leisure realm, are conquering the business world.

    • Elegant

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      Total evening elegance

      • A general recommendation for shoes at official occasions (receptions, weddings, etc.): Smooth, black (brown is absolutely taboo), with no cap and no excessively thick soles.
      • Just as with business attire, the Oxford is an absolute classic for an evening social wardrobe.
      • Do not wear Brogues at official events, because they are too sporty.
      • With a tuxedo and tails, it is best to combine patent leather shoes with smooth, fine socks. With a morning suit, wear smooth black shoes and solid grey socks.

    Ladies

    • Ladies

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      Where clothing and shoes are concerned, luckily there are no strict rules anymore. Whatever you like is allowed, and individual taste is decisive. Of course, exceptions prove the rule, so there are still a few standards, especially for official events or at work.

    • Leisure

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      Total freedom in your free time

      • The general rule for leisure time: Whatever you like is allowed. 
      • Dress to your mood, to the trend, to your personal taste, style, comfort or functionality.
      • Typical leisure shoes are Norwegian-front Oxfords, light moccasins, robust ankle boots or shoes with rustic Ghillie laces.

    • Business

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      Elegance in business

      • Before you decide on a certain look, first get oriented in your environment. In an advertising agency, things will definitely look looser than in, say, a management consultancy, a bank or an insurance company.
      • If a businesswoman is wearing a skirt, then fine hosiery helps create the perfect outfit — even in summer at 30°. If you want to show your legs, then your toenails should be polished and your legs carefully depilated.
      • Higher heels make the legs and figure seem longer, so a truly suitable shoe for business should not have excessively high heels. A small rule of thumb: The standard height is 3.5 cm.
      • Classic shoe styles for a suit are pumps, trotteurs, buckle shoes, tassel loafers and ballet shoes. High and ankle-length boots also go well with an ankle-length skirt. It becomes even more stylish if you wear high or ankle boots with a knee-length skirt.
      • In summer, strap sandals, high-heeled sandals or D’Orsays are good alternatives to the classic closed shoes mentioned above. However, high-heeled strap sandals will make you overdressed.
      • With a pantsuit, good flat lace-up shoes, such as the sporty Derby, the classically elegant Balmoral (such as the Oxford) or even the brogue go well.
      • What’s great about fashion: What was previously completely taboo at some point becomes the absolute height of fashion and finds its way into offices. So now even athletic shoes are worn with suits.
      • Colour is also seen more often now in business apparel. What once had to be solid coloured — preferably black, grey or brown — can now be more striking. Inspired by seasonal colours, such as two-tone orange-khaki or bright red.

    • Elegant

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      Evening beauty

      • It stands to reason that you don’t wear big, clunky shoes with an elegant evening dress. Here light, elegant shoes are called for, such as strap sandals or high-heeled pumps.
      • The shoes should be comfortable enough that you can casually move around in them all night, but that doesn’t mean that you should turn to leisure or comfort shoes. They look much too sporty, so they’re not suitable.
      • Generally speaking, in the evening you can wear something fancier and more extravagant.

    Conversion chart

    Fit wizard Women/Men

    • Fit wizard Women/Men

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      The right fit determines whether you feel good in your shoes or not. The right shoe should prevent foot fatigue and allow comfortable walking and standing. Shoes are the clothing item for which a perfect fit is especially important.

    • Why do shoes fit differently?

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      Various manufacturers use different lasts during shoe production. That’s why Deichmann precisely measures the length and width of each shoe. To get a perfect fit, you should always use our measuring template to determine your size.

    • When is a shoe the right length?

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      Order the size shown by our measuring template, because the push room for the toes is already factored in. Shoes that run large or small, are indicated with the sentence, “This shoe runs large/small.” Please be sure to follow our recommendation when ordering. Different manufacturers use various size data. If you need the right conversion to centimetres, British or American sizes for your German length measurement, use our size conversion chart.

    • When is a shoe the right width?

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      The shoe holds the foot in the ball area. In shoes that are too wide, the foot slides forward and slaps at the back, and too narrow a shoe pinches it. The pictogram shown with the shoe gives an idea of the foot width for which each shoe is suitable (dark blue = well suited).

    • What shoe goes with which shape of foot?

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      Narrow foot:
      Pointed shoes, lace-up shoes or narrowly cut slip-ons;

      Wide foot:
      Lace-up shoes, wide styles or even special-width shoes;

      High instep:
      Lace-up shoes, shoes with Velcro fasteners, slip-ons with elastic bands, and wide-cut pumps or ballet shoes;

      Inserts:
      Special-width shoes, lace-up shoes or shoes with removable inner socks

    • What should I watch for when I try shoes on?

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      If possible, try shoes on in the early afternoon, because in the evening feet are mildly swollen and in the morning the shoes fit too loosely. If you try the shoes in the morning, they’ll pinch in the evening. Also take enough time to break the shoes in. Do this first for a short time on a carpeted floor before you move on to harder flooring. Always put the shoes on with a shoehorn to avoid crushing their spines. A crushed spine changes a shoe’s fit.

      Fit wizard Children
      High demands are placed on children’s shoes even during development. The growth and maturing of the child’s foot has to be considered. Shoes that fit properly and conform to the shape of the foot are a prerequisite for maintaining healthy feet.

      Children barely feel pain, because their feet are still soft and malleable. They therefore don’t notice when their shoes have become too small. For example, they may wear shoes four sizes too small without mentioning it. Foot damage is often the result of ill-fitting children’s shoes. Every three months children’s feet should be remeasured: A child’s foot can grow two to three sizes in one year. The length and width must always be measured.

    • Why do shoes fit differently?

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      In this case, use our measuring template to determine your child’s shoe size. Our measuring template takes into account the necessary extra room for optimal fit. Order the size shown by our measuring template. Shoes that run large or small, are indicated with the sentence, “This shoe runs large/small.” Please be sure to follow our recommendation when ordering. In our children’s size conversion chart, we also offer you the data in centimetres.

    • When is a shoe the right width?

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      For the child’s foot to have the necessary support in the ball area, children’s shoes are offered in various widths. We provide you with the width data for every children’s shoe. You can determine the foot width with our children’s measuring template. All children’s shoes are marked as follows:

    • What should I watch for when I try shoes on?

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      When trying a shoe on, check the length again. Press with your thumb, or if a hard toe cap makes this impossible, use the following test:
       
      Hold the sole of the right shoe under the left foot and press it firmly to the foot. Between the foot and the edge of the uppers (the toe), small children should have a margin of 8 to 15 mm, and older children 12 to 15 mm. Consider the edge of the uppers and the lining, if there is one. Check the ball measurement by stroking the leather with your thumb with light pressure over the leather in the ball area. The shoe fits when the leather forms a slight fold. With the child standing, check the heel and ankle area. Make sure that the heel closes correctly and that the angle and closure of the uppers have enough space. The shoe must not flop when the child walks or runs.

    measuring template

    • measuring template

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      The measuring template is a precise length scale that you can print out.

      Here’s how it works:
      1. Select “Women/Men” or “Children” to load the fit wizard as a PDF document.

      2. To read the PDF document, you need Adobe Acrobat Reader. If you don’t have this program installed yet, you can download it free at http://www.adobe.de. 

      3. Once the document has loaded, you can print out the fit wizard in the program menu.
      (Note for Acrobat Reader version 4.0 or higher: To avoid printer specific size changes, remove the tick at the “page size” option in the print window.)

      4. To determine your shoe size, proceed according to the instructions on the printout.

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